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First workshop complete!

On Tuesday 24 September 2013, 25 ecosystem scientists from around Australia - representing a range of disciplines, organisations, and perspectives - gathered in Brisbane for the initial ‘starter’ workshop for the Australian Ecosystem Science Long-Term Plan.

Initiated by the Steering Committee the workshop was intended to:

  1. Build a shared understanding of the open consultative process for developing this Plan; and
  2. Generate the first contributions of content for the Plan to feed into this consultative process.
Click here to read the workshop report.

 

Topics covered

Participants at the workshop discussed a range of questions and issues of relevance to the formation of the Long-Term Plan, including:

What are the advantages of developing a long-term plan for ecosystem science in Australia?
What is the scope and purpose of such a plan?
Who should be involved in the formation of this plan?
What is the best process to develop a Plan that is inclusive and representative of the Australian ecosystem science community?
What are the biggest impediments to delivering ecosystem science and outcomes in Australia?
What are the best opportunities for advancing the delivery of ecosystem science and management in Australia over the next 20 years?

 

You can read the workshop report for more details, and view these videos to hear some perspectives on the future of Australian ecosystem science.

 

Next steps

This workshop is the first of many activities that will be used as part of the open consultation process to engage the Australian ecosystem science community for input into the Ecosystem Science Long-Term Plan.

The process that will now unfold to develop the Ecosystem Science Long-Term Plan is centred on principles of openness, inclusivity, and transparency and will include:

  1. An open, online survey to seek input from the wide ecosystem science community to the Plan;
  2. Open Town-Hall meetings around the country to provide further opportunity for the ecosystem science community to discuss and have input to the Plan;
  3. An ongoing cycle of revision and updating of a draft Plan document in response to the input from the broader ecosystem science community; and
  4. Direct engagement with the end-users of ecosystem science to ensure the relevance and utility of the Plan and its content.
Across October-November 2013 you can expect to hear more from the Steering Committee about the roll out of the consultation process, with details of how you can be involved in building the Ecosystem Science Long-Term Plan.